A New Perspective on Home

2 09 2009

Fortresses without fences and walls

A few days ago I got an email from someone in Africa who had been reading my blog.  He asked why I have been so silent since I had gotten home.  It was a good question.

There are reasons.  I took time to reconnect with family, including my wife.  A few weeks before our 33rd wedding anniversary we took a weekend in North Dakota.  Why North Dakota?  A couple of years ago when we had gone to the northwestern states of Washington and Oregon, I had accomplished a goal of visiting all 48 contiguous United States.  After that my wife, Dawn, realized that she had been with me to most of them, but that she was missing North Dakota.  It was not a high priority, but we finally filled that gap.

The next weekend I was honored to do the marriage ceremony of a former student on Saturday.  The next day we took a one day trip to Kansas City for our granddaughter Cady’s first birthday party.  Eleven hours of driving for five hours of family time, but well worth it, especially since our youngest daughter, Shanna, was also there from Chicago.

Cady Birthday party outside

Cady Birthday party outside

Cady with Shanna

Cady with Shanna

Cady with Grandmas.  Dawn on the left

Cady with Grandmas. Dawn on the left

The next day we jumped into faculty meetings to prepare for teaching the upcoming semester.  I returned to preaching at Living Water Community Church.  Then we had the Week of Welcome for new and returning students, classes starting, our anniversary on Friday, August 28, and preaching again on Sunday.  I have fully jumped back into the pace of American life.

Starting classes

Starting classes

Freshman Orientation Group (Core 100) around my 1967 Mustang

Freshman Orientation Group (Core 100) around my 1967 Mustang

Yet things are different after the Zambia experience.  I have taken a few walks around my small community and tried to look at it with the same eyes I used to look at Ndola.  What often struck me in Ndola was the difference between the wealthier areas and the poorer ones.  The wealthier areas were walled in and often felt lifeless.  In the poorer areas I saw the poverty and need, but I also saw community and heard the joyful life of children.  I am glad that my community does not have all the walls and fences.  I am thankful to live in a peaceful, safe place where there is not a great deal of fear.  Yet the houses still feel like fortresses, just without the walls and fences.  We still hole up in our boxes.  Although a few people are out walking, mostly we still isolate ourselves from each other in our even smaller moving boxes.  I miss walking with Zambians.

Sioux Center from South

Sioux Center from South

Sioux Center stone fortress

Sioux Center stone fortress

Red Fortress

Red Fortress

My house (fortress?)

My house (fortress?)

Sioux Center new lake and beach (New golf course)

Sioux Center new lake and beach (New golf course)

Although I am a city boy and have had some issues adjusting to small town life in a farming area, I am learning to appreciate the beauty of farming.  This has been an incredible growing season.  There has been plenty of rain.  Although the crop is a little behind schedule, I am told, it looks wonderfully prosperous.  I have heard that the corn is up to thirteen feet tall in some places.  I am not sure soy bean plants are supposed to be three to four feet tall.  It is wondrous to look over the verdant fields of green covering the gently rolling hills.  Nothing in Zambia looked like this.  I am not sure if many places in the world are this fertile.  I hope we can share this crop with the world.

soy and corn fields

soy and corn fields

soy field

soy field

I hope to now change my direction and purpose.  Over the summer I was a reporter and commentator on Zambia to mostly Americans, with a few Zambians listening in.  Now maybe I can share Sioux Center, Iowa with Zambians and a few others listening in.  the goal is the same, to share the adventure in a way that looks for God in the variety of his world and seeks to serve to be an ambassador of his Good News.





Home

6 08 2009

Home

I am now back home. Now there are many more things on which to focus. The return trip went well. There was little jet lag. The laundry is all done. Now it is time to get ready for Fall courses.

I figure I should give some closure to my Zambia experience. In leaving Zambia I wanted to avoid the extra luggage fee. I packed the large suitcase very full. Too full it turned out. I packed the smaller suitcase with everything else inside a vinyl bag inside the suitcase. I left behind most toilettes and my jeans and shoes that I had worn out by walking. When I got to the airport, the big suitcase was too heavy, but they said I could repack my two suitcases. I took out the vinyl bag, and it became my carry-on. Then I took some items from the larger suitcase and put them in the smaller one. In all the re-doing I was not charged a luggage fee.

Worn out pants

Worn out pants

Worn out shoes

Worn out shoes

The flight from Ndola to Joburg was clear. Since I now always had my camera, I did something I had never done before. I took pictures out of the airplane window. The layover in Joburg gave me time to find a couple of items for Cady, my almost one-year-old granddaughter.

Airplane loading

Airplane loading

Kariba Lake

Kariba Lake

Over South Africa

Over South Africa

Above Johannesburg

Above Johannesburg

The flight from Joburg to Atlanta was long and dark, but uneventful. My seatmates were a young man from a Las Vegas church who had been doing mission work in eastern Zambia for six weeks, and an elk rancher from North Dakota who had been hunting in Mozambique. All there was to do was watch movies, check the flight map, and sleep.

Customs was easy, but because I had been on a farm in Zambia, I had to report in to agricultural customs. It worked out that it was a good thing that I had left my shoes in Zambia or I would have had to leave them at customs. Fortunately, my flight was able to get out of Atlanta just before a thunderstorm, and I was only about a half hour late getting into Omaha.

Leaving Atlanta before storm

Leaving Atlanta before storm

Above the storm

Above the storm

Crossing the Mississippi River

Crossing the Mississippi River

Over the Midwest

Over the Midwest

Into Omaha

Into Omaha

Since Dawn and I were now half way to Kansas City, we headed down there to see Hope, Jeff, and Cady, our daughter, son-in-law, and granddaughter. It was good to share stories with them, although with the blogging, they already knew most of what I had done. They did get to see and receive some items from Africa. It was better to see Cady walking around.

Cady Walking

Cady Walking

Cady meeting the Lion with Dawn

Cady meeting the Lion with Dawn

Meadors Family bubbles

Meador Family bubbles

We got back Sunday night, and I am starting to get reoriented. I am looking forward to motivating my American students to become engaged like my Zambian students. I am even more convinced that the Biblical story gives life perspective, purpose, and hope.

The blogging will not be daily, but I hope it will continue to be weekly. Blogging was a great way to reflect on the events of my summer adventure. I am pleased that so many took the adventure with me through the blog. I did also upload 27 short videos to YouTube. These are mostly of the worship service singing, although the YouTube sound is not good. A few are from the Chobe safari and Victoria Falls.

May the adventure continue.

Youtube video links:

Ebenezer Baptist

Reformed Church of Zambia

United Church of Zambia

Chobe Safari

Victoria Falls





Religion in Zambia

29 07 2009
Village Compound

Village Compound

Religion in Zambia

The last few blogs have been mainly reporting with pictures, but without much commentary.  I had limited internet connection and limited time.  Today was 13 ½ hours by bus from Livingstone to Ndola, so I had some time to think.

Bus Stops

Bus Stops

Religion is very public in Zambia.  Most of the minibuses have religious slogans or logos at the top of the windshield or on the back window.  Stores and other businesses often have Hebrew Biblical names.  Some have Biblical texts on their buildings or signs.  There is often Christian music playing in the stores and restaurants.  There was Christian music playing through the speakers on the bus.  Some was in a different language, but I could recognize the Divine Names used.  One of my seatmates ringtone on his phone was a Christian hymn tune.

I was prompted to reflect on this because as I loaded on the bus in Livingstone at 5:30, I was soon greeted with an evangelistic sermon from a Pentecostal preacher.  Interestingly, he basically presented the Roman Road, which I had commented on a few blogs ago.  His message had the basics of the Gospel, but it was also very much about getting to heaven as the primary goal of the Gospel.  Much of the Christianity is a “soul saving,” world flight, going to heaven after death type.  The songs are often of the “I’ll Fly Away,” old Country Gospel, variety.  I did appreciate the pastor’s prayer for safe travel and even his declaration against any witchcraft or demons on the bus in the name of Jesus.  I was concerned when he kept preaching as the bus left the station, but he got off at the police checkpoint on the outskirts of town.

The prayer against witchcraft and demons did catch my attention more because of two discussions I had had in Lusaka.  The brother of the business manager at Northrise who had set up the guest house for me, Hamoonga Choongo, and I had dinner on Thursday night.  He is studying at Jackson State University in Mississippi for a doctorate in management and leadership.  His real passion is the psychology of religion as it relates to demon possession and witchcraft.  His wife was under the power of witchcraft practiced by her father and an aunt against her for the first 30 years of her life.  She now speaks throughout the US on the reality of witchcraft and evil powers.  I commented that I do not understand this area even though I believe there are evil forces and powers.  I focus on the Good News that they have been defeated in Christ and that we do not need to fear them.

Hamoonga Choongo

Hamoonga Choongo

On Saturday morning one of the professors at Justo Mwale Theological College stopped into the guest house for a chat.  He had done his Masters of Theology at Calvin Seminary and written on demon possession and exorcism.  He said that the professors at Calvin really did not believe in either one.  At first the Reformed Church of Zambia did not either, but now he has gotten them to address the issue of demon possession through the ministry of the church.  We agreed that Western Christianity has gone too far in rejecting the idea of evil spirits and forces by secularizing it and making it all medical disorders or mental illness, and that the danger in Africa is to make every problem related to evil spirits and giving them too much power.

The rest of the ride to Lusaka was uneventful.  There were no evil spirits active that I could tell.  The 45 minute bumpy, dusty detour was still there.  I did make sure I sat on the side of the bus so I would see the other side of the road from the one on my trip in.  There were more little villages and compounds with the round huts and thatched roofs on this side of the road.

Huts in Morning Mist

Huts in Morning Mist

Corral

Corral

Compound

Compound

Roadside Market

Roadside Market

Monze Market

Monze Market

Bus Stop Market

Bus Stop Market

Mazabuka

Mazabuka

When I got into Lusaka, the 1 pm bus was full.  I had to wait over an hour for the next bus.  I could have walked around the area some more, but I had no desire to see more of Lusaka.  Again as we were about to leave the station, a man got up, offered a prayer and started preaching.  Again I appreciated the prayer, but his message was more a distortion of the Bible into the Health and Wealth message.  According to him, God will give you everything and anything you ask for in faith and allow you to do everything you desire.  It was a good example of taking verses out of context and then using the literal words to say anything you want them to say.  I was also troubled that he took a collection.  The first preacher had rejected this action.

Coming into Lusaka

Coming into Lusaka

Lusaka Shirt Shop

Lusaka Shirt Shop

Bus to Ndola

Bus to Ndola

I mentioned to my seat-mate that I was having a hard time with some of the things the preacher was saying.  This started an interesting 4-5 hour conversation.  He was also a minority, but quite different than I.  He was an Indian Hindu who was starting a soy oil processing business in Kitwe, where he had lived since the age of 15.  I am guessing that was for about 20 years.

Kipiri Mposhi

Kipiri Mposhi

We discussed the similarities and differences between Christianity and Hinduism, along with being a minority in Zambia and Zambian culture.  We agreed a great deal on the human problem.  People are basically selfish and seek personal material gain by power and often violence, even if it is subtle violence of dishonesty and corruption.  We agreed on a general view of God as the creator whose purposes should be served in the world by humans.  We then discussed the primary Hindu gods of Krishna, Vishnu, Shiva, and Ganesha.  I pointed out the similarities of the idea of a son of God that mediates human prayers.  I commented on the oneness of God.  He in part agreed because he is a henotheistic Hindu, believing in one chief god.

In talking about the Hindu story, I pointed out the major difference in how God deals with evil in the two faiths.  In Hinduism Krishna gave his five original followers permission to kill those who were doing evil.  In Christianity God’s Son receives the evil and does not strike back.  I fear my discussion partner was more interested in talking than listening.  I am not sure he understood the points I made about Christianity.

Kapiri means mountain

Kapiri means mountain

We talked about reincarnation in contrast to recreation.  We discussed Karma and the principles of divine justice.  This led into the ideas of forgiveness and repentance.  It seems to me that Hinduism has a place for human repentance, but not forgiveness from God.  God is very much the judge in Hinduism.  Also, I stated that Karma seemed too deterministic to me, and we agreed that both our faiths have to wrestle with God’s purposes and human freedom and responsibility.

We also mostly agreed on ethics and the concept of prayer.  Humans should serve the purposes of God in the world by loving, serving, and respecting each other.  We had a very respectful discussion and were seeking to serve each other.

Humans should be humble before God, realizing that we are not in control of this world.  The Hindu morning prayer is basically to serve God in the day.  The evening prayer is to reflect on the day and what one did in service and what one could have done better.  Here it seemed to me that Hinduism becomes a works righteousness religion.

When we talked about Zambian culture, my seat-mate expressed what I would consider some prejudices.  He saw Zambians as hard working, but without vision or desire to improve things.  He felt Zambians had no life, no sense of family activity and no real purpose.  The major problem he saw was dishonesty and theft at all levels of the society, especially among governmental leaders.  Again we were back to the problem of human selfishness, seeking to gain for oneself without concern for others.

We agreed on the problem, but not on the solution.  Yet it troubled me that if many Zambians are Christians and even consider their nation to be a Christian nation, why are dishonesty, corruption, and a general lack of integrity seen as major problems.  Christianity is first about a new relationship with God and your neighbor now in this life before the benefits of life in a new creation.  I stated that I did not understand human sin, but that in the Gospel I saw hope for forgiveness for humanity now and change for the whole world now and in the future through the power of Christ’s victory and God’s Spirit.

There are many things I wish I would have said better or more clearly.  We both agreed that it is not up to us to change someone.  That idea is behind much of the religious violence in the world today.  All we can do is present our views.  I said it was up to God to change a person.  My partner said it was up to the person to decide to change.  This did not fully fit with all things being planned by God, but this man said that as a Hindu he believes our meeting and discussion was not by accident.  According to him, we might have met in another life or might meet again in the next.  I said that is not how I saw it, but I agreed that such discussions are not by accident.

Dinner Waiting at the Flat

Dinner and internet waiting at the Flat





Chobe Safari

28 07 2009

Chobe Safari

Lions, and hippos, and elephants, oh my.

Today I crossed over into Botswana to take a day safari at the Chobe National Park.  I shared the ride to the safari with the Kleiners from Drenthe, the Netherlands, a group of about 30 students from an Irish Catholic church, who had been doing a mission service project, and a couple from New Zealand.  The Kleiners and I rode in the car with the students on a bus.  I talked een klein beetje Nederlands (“a little bit of Dutch”) with the Kleiners.  We also talked a little bit about Dutch church politics.

After about an hour drive, we got to the Botswana crossing of the Zambezi River at the point where Zambia, Zimbabwe, Namibia, and Botswana meet.  There are scores, maybe hundreds, of trucks waiting to cross by ferry, one at a time.  Unfortunately our trip was faster with three loads of people on a speed boat ferry across the river.

Speedboat Ferry Group

Speedboat Ferry Group

Dugout canoe to cross the river

Dugout canoe to cross the river

Next was an immigration check where everyone has to fill out two forms with only a couple of pens for the 30-40 people.  Then there was a short ride to the safari company offices and on to the Chobe Lodge.  There we got on a boat for a two hour river cruise.

Getting on the Chobe River

Getting on the Chobe River

At first I was concerned that this might be a disappointment.  There were a lot of birds of different types and a few animals in the distance.  Then we encountered the hippos, swimming, sleeping, and roaming.  There is no shortage of hippos here.  It is amazing that something that big can swim.

Birds

Birds

Drying Wings

Drying Wings

Swimming Hippos

Swimming Hippos

Hippo

Hippo

Crouching Hippo

Crouching Hippo

Then there were the crocodiles, the Cape Buffalos, the Legwe (?) antelope, and water monitor lizards.  Then the elephants arrived with impalas and Kudos.  On the way back four elephants decided to give us a swimming display as they crossed the river.  It is amazing that something that big can swim.

Crocodile

Crocodile

Crocodiles

Crocodiles

Cape Buffalo

Cape Buffalo

Water Monitor Lizard

Water Monitor Lizard

Hillside elephants

Hillside elephants

Elephants at the Beach

Elephants at the Beach

Elephant swim

Elephant swim

After lunch we loaded into the safari trucks for a land tour.  Again we started slowly with antelope, birds, and warthogs.  Then there was the herd of female elephants and babies.  Next came the giraffes.  On the way back we got close to a number of animals, including having to wait for the elephants to cross the road.

Legwe antelope and warthogs

Legwe antelope and warthogs

Warthogs

Warthogs

Teal Rooter Bird

Teal Rooter Bird

Ribbed Mongoose

Ribbed Mongoose

Elephant herd

Elephant herd

Giraffes

Giraffes

Necking Giraffes

Necking Giraffes

Posing Kudo

Posing Kudo

Elephant Crossing

Elephant Crossing

Finally, there were the lions.  We did not get very close to them, and they were mostly hidden in the underbrush.  Still we saw lions.   After the lions we stopped for a baby giraffe crossing the road and some up-close impala.  The joke about the impala is that they have black markings on their rear ends that look like the McDonalds logo.  Impalas are fast food for the lions.

Lying Lion

Lying Lion

Kudo Female Closeup

Kudo Female Closeup

Impalas

Impalas

Baby Giraffe Crossing

Baby Giraffe Crossing

Baby Giraffe catching Mom

Baby Giraffe catching Mom

It was a very good day and a great way to close my adventure.  Now what remains is about 11 hours on buses tomorrow to get back to Ndola and then about 19 hours of airline flights on Thursday and Friday.

Passport check

Passport check





Light on the Zambezi

28 07 2009

Light on the Zambezi

Today began and ended with different light on the Zambezi River. As the morning clouds were starting to dissipate, I headed back to Mosi-Oa-Tunya, Victoria Falls, to see them in the morning light. I think this did help bring out some more color in the pictures. It also made the rainbows in different places. I love rainbows. There was something great about the double rainbows in the mist of the falls.

Along the Gorge

Along the Gorge

Rainbows in the Gorge

Rainbows in the Gorge

Center falls

Center falls

Center West Falls

Center West Falls

I just explored the falls from different angles. I did find the trail that gave one a different view of the falls and the river outlet. Unfortunately, because this trail was in the outskirts of the park and without many people, the obnoxious marketers who sneak into the park would not leave me alone. I brought a few crafts just to get rid of them. Maybe this helped me build up resistance to all craft booths just outside the park gate. I brought a little, but not much.

Across from falls

Across from falls

Boiling Pot from Above

Boiling Pot from Above

Across from falls

Across from falls

Across from Falls closer

Across from Falls closer

Through the Outlet

Through the Outlet

River Outlet

River Outlet

At the end of the trail

At the end of the trail

Craft stall

Craft stall

On my way out of the park I met Boswell, a wood carver from Mukuni Village, a traditional village a little ways out of town. Boswell helped me get a bus into town. I hope I get back from my mini-safari early enough tomorrow to get to his village.

I explored downtown Livingstone only a little because I had to get to the bank to get US dollars for the safari tomorrow. I had to at minimum change enough Kwacha for $100. This left me without any Kwachas. None of the ATMs would take my debit card. I finally found a bank that would cash traveler’s checks. I waited in line for over 1 ½ hours. It was getting very close to the time I needed to be back for the evening cruise on the Zambezi. When I finally got to a teller, she could not cash my travelers’ checks without proof of purchase, which was back in the room. Fortunately, I could get money out from the teller on my debit card. Banking is very slow in a primarily cash economy. Although waiting in line was very stressful, it was interesting to see third world banking. People were coming in with bags of cash to deposit. Others were leaving with a great deal of cash.

Livingstone Market

Livingstone Market

Livingstone Downtown

Livingstone Downtown

From the bank I ran back about 1-2 kilometers to the lodge. I got there about five minutes before my ride arrived. I quickly washed and changed my shirt and then headed out for an evening cruise on the Zambezi. They did take credit cards, so I did not need the extra cash.

The cruise was pleasant and calm. We only saw a few animals, but it was interesting to see the hippos swimming in the river and on the shore. I now know from experience why hippopotamus is Greek for “river horse.” It was good to experience the Zambezi in the evening light. At this point I started to miss my wife, Dawn, the most. This is exactly the type of activity she would love.

On African Princess

On African Princess

The Zambezi

The Zambezi

Swimming Hippo

Swimming Hippo

Hippos on shore

Hippos on shoreBefore the sunset

Zambezi Sun

Zambezi Sun

Sundown

SundownTwilight on the Zambezi





God’s Good Pleasure

27 07 2009

God’s Good Pleasure

What a wonderful variety in this world.  Pictures cannot do it justice.  There is variety of landscape, of people, of living, and then there is Mosi-ao-Tunya, the Smoke that Thunders, or Victoria Falls.

I started out early this morning and got to the bus station a little before six.  This allowed me to get a window seat again, which made more sense for this journey than it did for the airplane flights.  I had 6 ½ hours to look out the window at the countryside of southern Zambia between Lusaka and Livingstone.

The Bus

The Bus

Traveling companions

Traveling companions

Breakfast stop

Breakfast stop

It is not an exciting drive.  I am not sure what to call the landscape, but the name of an old TV show kept coming to mind, “High Chaparral.”  There are a few rolling hills with grassland and scrub trees.  Yet the trees look a little different, and the grass is all brown.  The different part is how people live.  I had seen the pictures of the small African villages or compounds with the round homes with thatched roofs.  I had seen a few between Ndola and Lusaka.  On this stretch there were numerous ones.

Roadside compound

Roadside compound

Classic Huts

Classic Huts

Six and a half hours is a long time on a bus, but it is a good way to see what the country looks like.  It got a little more interesting near the end.  When there is only one paved two lane road through the whole area, what do you do when the road needs major repair of resurfacing?  It seems the only option is to carve a bumpy two lane dirt road through along the railway for about 25-30 miles.

Sunday Suits

Sunday Suits

Back Road

Back Road

Road Repair

Road Repair

Livingstone Bus stop

Livingstone Bus stop

Ngolide Lodge front

Ngolide Lodge front

Finally, we made it to Livingstone.  After waiting a few minutes to get into my room, I quickly ate the other half of the sub from last night and headed for the Falls.  Sunday seems like a good time to go there.  It was not busy.  The Falls are incredible, and there is no way to take a picture that fully shows them.  I must have taken a couple hundred pictures to try.  It is a good thing that digital pictures do not cost anything.

Victoria Falls Greeter

Victoria Falls Greeter

Victoria Falls East Cataract

Victoria Falls East Cataract

Victoria Falls 2

Victoria Falls 2

Victoria Falls 3

Victoria Falls 3

Victoria Falls 4

Victoria Falls 4

Mosi-ao-Tunya is what the Africans called them.  It means “the smoke that thunders.”  This makes a lot more sense than Victoria Falls, which is what David Livingstone named them.  Whatever you call them, they need to be experienced to appreciate them.

Rainbows in the mist

Rainbows in the mist

Mosi-ao-Tunya

Mosi-ao-Tunya

Mist in the Gorge

Mist in the Gorge

Rainbow

Rainbow

I tried to experience them in a variety of ways.  I walked the footbridge through the mist and then out to the end point of the Zambian side of the gorge.  Then I played part mountain goat and climbed down the rocky path, waded through streams, and climbed over rocks to get down into the gorge where all the water from the Falls converge.  It is called the Boiling Pot.  It is quite an experience to get there.  I am glad a local decided to become my guide for a tip or I never would have figured out how to get there.  Most of the lower path has been washed away and replaced by large boulders.

The Boiling Pot

The Boiling Pot

Lower Zambezi

Lower Zambezi

Lower Zambezi Boiling Pot

Lower Zambezi Boiling Pot

Evening Falls

Evening Falls

Evening at Falls Edge

Evening at Falls Edge

Upper Zambezi Evening

Upper Zambezi Evening

Sunset above the Falls

Sunset above the Falls





African Animal Warm-up

27 07 2009

African Animal Warm-up

If you are reading this, you probably saw that I got a couple of hours of internet time this morning to post my blogs with pictures.  Since not much else was happening around Justo Mwale, I went out to Laliya, a small game lodge about 25 km south of Lusaka.  I figured I could check out this option for students in the future and have a safari warm-up for Livingstone.

Laliya Lodge

Laliya Lodge

I arrived just after noon, and the hourly game drive had just left.  For the next hour I took my own walking safari, after I made sure it was safe.  In a large open cut meadow there were a herd of Puku, medium antelope mostly only in Zambia.  I thought it must be normal for them to be there, but later the guide told me that this was unusual.  I got close enough to get their attention, but not to spook them.  Back at the lodge I had my first encounter with the warthog.

Bush Safari walk Laliya

Bush Safari walk Laliya

Puku Antelope at Laliya

Puku Antelope at Laliya

Puku Closer

Puku Closer

Warthog encounter

Warthog encounter

For the 1:00 game drive I found out that I was the only one going that that time.  I was afraid I would have to wait until 2:00, but no, I had a personal safari tour.  We did not see anything for the first 20 minutes.  Then we saw two giraffes at a salt lick.  From there we moved to see zebras and another animal, of which I do not remember the name.  Then we turned around to see the giraffes on the move and five other ones in the distance.

Private Game Drive with Sonate

Private Game Drive with Sonate

Giraffes at salt lick

Giraffes at salt lick

Zebras and others

Zebras and others

Zebra Lookout

Zebra Lookout

Plain Giraffe

Plain Giraffe

Across the road we saw two other warthogs running through the bush.  Then there was a small bushbuck antelope in the trees.  Soon there was a large Kudo in another thicket of trees, and then we returned to the Puku.

Bushbuck

Bushbuck

Kudo Hidden

Kudo Hidden

While I waited for my ride to return, I walked down to see the Puku again and then watched the warthog lawn mower.

Warthog lawn mower

Warthog lawn mower

I returned to the Pilgrim Wesleyan guest house, so I could walk to the bus stop in the morning.  I had not eaten much all day, so I went back to Cairo Road.  I was not in an adventurous mode I this point.  I got a foot-long sub from Subway.  I figured I could eat half now and the other half on the long bus ride tomorrow.  On the way back I also stopped at Shoprite for some water and snacks for tomorrow.  I found out that the other Shoprite was closed because of an employee strike for better paid for long term employees.

Lunch Dinner Breakfast

Lunch Dinner Breakfast

Shoprite

Shoprite

This was a good starter.  I am expecting even greater animal and natural adventures in Livingstone.  There I should be able to post this with pictures.








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